Robotic Myomectomy with da Vinci Surgical Robot Hutchinson KS

The da Vinci surgical robot is a major advance in the ability to precisely operate through small incisions. The hand movements in the surgeon are duplicated in the patient by the robot. Most importantly, the instruments duplicate the wrist movements of the surgeon, allowing the instruments to change angles to allow precise suturing.

Michael Edward Dobbs, MD
(620) 669-6691
1100 N Main St
Hutchinson, KS
Specialties
Obstetrics & Gynecology
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Univ Of Tx Med Branch Galveston, Galveston Tx 77550
Graduation Year: 1975

Data Provided by:
Kathryn E Sawchak, MD
(620) 662-2229
1901 N Waldron St Bldg 3B
Hutchinson, KS
Specialties
Obstetrics & Gynecology
Gender
Female
Education
Medical School: Baylor Coll Of Med, Houston Tx 77030
Graduation Year: 1993
Hospital
Hospital: Wesley Med Ctr, Wichita, Ks
Group Practice: Woman's Place

Data Provided by:
George Edward Cullan, MD
(620) 669-2500
2101 N Waldron St
Hutchinson, KS
Specialties
Obstetrics & Gynecology
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Creighton Univ Sch Of Med, Omaha Ne 68178
Graduation Year: 1983

Data Provided by:
Ann Hentzen Page
(620) 662-2229
1818 E 23rd Ave
Hutchinson, KS
Specialty
Obstetrics & Gynecology

Data Provided by:
Thomas Charles Simpson, MD
(620) 278-2123
239 N Broadway Ave
Sterling, KS
Specialties
Family Practice, Obstetrics And Gynecology
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Univ Of Ks Sch Of Med, Kansas City Ks 66103
Graduation Year: 1973
Hospital
Hospital: Rice County Hosp District One, Lyons, Ks
Group Practice: Sterling Medical Ctr

Data Provided by:
Natividad Cua Alonzo, MD
Hutchinson, KS
Specialties
Obstetrics & Gynecology
Gender
Female
Education
Medical School: Far Eastern Univ, Dr N Reyes Med Fndn Inst Of Med, Manila, Philippines
Graduation Year: 1961

Data Provided by:
Darrel Ray Neuschafer, MD
(620) 669-2500
2101 N Waldron St
Hutchinson, KS
Specialties
Obstetrics & Gynecology
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Univ Of Ks Sch Of Med, Kansas City Ks 66103
Graduation Year: 1974

Data Provided by:
Kathryn Sawchak
(620) 662-2229
1818 E 23rd Ave
Hutchinson, KS
Specialty
Obstetrics & Gynecology

Data Provided by:
Ann M Hentzen Page, MD
(316) 685-7676
1818 E 23rd Ave
Hutchinson, KS
Specialties
Obstetrics & Gynecology
Gender
Female
Education
Medical School: Univ Of Tx Southwestern Med Ctr At Dallas, Med Sch, Dallas Tx 75235
Graduation Year: 1990

Data Provided by:
Abd El-Karim Tayiem, MD
(913) 367-3900
215 M St
Atchison, KS
Specialties
Obstetrics & Gynecology
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Kasr El Aini Fac Med Cairo Univ, Cairo (915-02 After 1/1971)
Graduation Year: 1968

Data Provided by:
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Robotic Myomectomy with da Vinci Surgical Robot

Robotic Myomectomy with da Vinci Surgical Robot

by Paul D. Indman, MD, USA, OBGYN.net Editorial Advisor   It is advantageous to perform surgery in the least invasive way possible while still getting optimal results. Although I usually prefer to do surgery through a laparoscope rather than through a larger incision, I have felt limited by the lack of wrist-like movements of the instruments. I felt that deeper myomas (that couldn’t be removed by a hysteroscope) were better removed through a regular incision.

The da Vinci surgical robot is a major advance in the ability to precisely operate through small incisions. As shown below, the surgeon sits at a console (see photo) and looks through a 3-dimensional videocamera

The hand movements in the surgeon are duplicated in the patient by the robot. Most importantly, the instruments duplicate the wrist movements of the surgeon, allowing the instruments to change angles to allow precise suturing. (Photo below shows robot being used in delicate heart surgery.)

Here are photos of an actual robotic myomectomy in which I removed 5 fibroids:

1. An incision is being made with the da Vinci robot through the myometrium (muscle of the uterus) down to the fibroid.

2. The fibroid is grasped and dissected away from the surrounding myometrium.

3. The fibroid is almost free. Another small fibroid, which will also be removed, is seen at the bottom right.

4. The area where the myoma was is being sutured in layers.

The da Vinci does not always eliminate the need for abdominal myomectomy. When there are very large myomas and/or many myomas an abdominal myomectomy may be preferable.

I frequently get email asking how big is big and how many are too many. All of this is relative. The size of the uterus, the size of the woman, and the desire to retain fertility are only a few of the factors that enter into the decision making process. I can not make meaningful recommendations without actually seeing you! I frequently find that the records are quite different than what I find on my own evaluation, and that my recommendations after seeing someone are totally different than I would have made from reviewing records alone.
  Visit Dr. Indman's web sites: All About Myomectomy and Alternatives in Gynecology ©2006, Paul Indman, MD. All Rights Reserved
15195 National Avenue, Suite 201; Los Gatos, CA 95032
Telephone : 408 358-2788 ; FAX : 408 356-5526

The medical information presented in this website represents the opinion of Dr. Indman, and is based on his knowledge and experience. It is not applicable to all patients or physicians. Anyone visiting this or other related medical sites should discuss symptoms, findings, and alternatives with their personal gynecologist.  

Click here to read more from OBGYN.net

What to Ask When Considering Robotic Surgery

In the fields of urology, the development of robotically assisted surgery uses the da Vinci Surgical Platform for better outcomes. But, what should the patient consider before deciding on this type of surgery?

Firstly, it is always a good idea to get a second opinion regarding the diagnosis, and to make sure that proceeding with a robotically assisted surgery is the best approach. Next, make sure that the facility has the right equipment for the job. Remember, just because you had a “minimally invasive surgery,” and should have “less pain” than open surgery, it does not mean that your surgery would not be “pain-free.”

Ask your surgeon about his or her experience with using the robot. Since the robot has been around for several years, there are formal training centers where surgeons can learn this new technique, either integrated during their residency training (some as long as 6 years), or extra as part of a fellowship (ranging between 1-3 years). Some of the latest literature suggests the need for at least 50 cases before most surgeons are comfortable with the new approach, advocating a rigorous training and that perhaps the old adage in medicine: “see one, do one, teach one” does not apply in this particular situation.

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